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-country, 5-day tour, meant to establish u.s. ties and to reconfirm and build some of those ties, so he takes a lot of criticism for this trip as you well know having watched the coverage over the last several days as the attack on libya was ramping up. bill: in the meantime president obama suggesting libyan people are ready to move on without qaddafi from an interview late last night. >> we believe it's not a matter of military might, but instead an idea that comes to the libyan people that it's time for a change that ends up ultimately sweeping qaddafi out of power. bill: that may be the case in the end. so far though that's not happened. new videotape you can watch from tripoli, the libyan capitol, this as car daie appearing -- this is qaddafi appearing last night in front of a crowd, it looks like several thousand people in a field, at the same palace that was bombed two days ago by these tomahawk cruise missiles launched by the british into that palace. want to bring in this map now and show you the theater of operations throughout the entire mediterranean and europe. there are so
in u.s. history a fact not lost on those here at the pumps. the price affects everything from flying to fruits and veggies. how much is that hurting you? >> it's really bad. it's really bad, probably about $75 to $80 to fill this up oar are our country uses 400 million gallons of gas a day. >> right now it's an easy $4. that's already there in california. wouldn't be surprised to see a this get closer to $5. >> reporter: that doesn't sit well here in baltimore. >> it's troubling. it does not stop me from driving around because necessity overweighs the cost of the gas and you just have to make it work. >> reporter: at the pump there's acceptance. they stay it will go to $5. >> that's fine. >> reporter: california is the worst. the mountain states the best. maryland is somewhere in the middle. >> got to go to work. got to pick my kids up. got to do what i got to do. >> reporter: the u.s. government has a strategic gasoline reserve of three quarters of a billion gallons of gas. jess, back to you . >> the last time that reserve was tapped, prices went down 25 cents. >> we're learning mor
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
to be qaddafi's presidential compound. still, both the brits and the u.s. military leaders say qaddafi is not the target of this mission. >> this is not about going -- going after qaddafi himself or attacking him at this particular point in time. it's about achieving these narrow and relatively limited objectives so that he stops killing his people and so humanitarian support can be provided. >> still, certainly it is sys m symbolic to the libyan leader can hit his home. our defense secretary says the u.s. role in this effort should begin to diminish. >> we expect that in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> admiral mullin says that support role will include intelligence support, jamming capabilities and assistance with the overall mission and the no-fly zone. back to you guys in new york. >> thanks for setting the table. john kerry, seniator sessions, admiral mullin, e
to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's something of a mixed message coming from the administration since the military action started a week ago yesterday. it's not only republicans, it's democrats as well. the administration on the one hand has a need to play to the arab street, but they're also now trying to play to main street here in the united states. they have emphasized all along that this is an international coalition that includes arab nations. at one point secretary clinton said we are not in the lead but clearly the united states has been in the lead. they
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
this morning from a top u.s. official on the american mission in libya. nbc's david gregory asked defense secretary robert gates about our involvement in the conflict in an interview that will air on "meet the press" later this morning. >> is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no, i don't think it's a vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> secretary gates joins secretary of state hillary clinton on today's "meet the press," so check your local listings for that. tomorrow, we will have live coverage of president obama's address to the nation at 7:30 p.m. eastern time. >>> and there is word from syria this morning that 12 people have been killed in violence rocking a seaside mediterranean city. the government says the victims include security forces and residents. this amateur video obtained by the "associated press" was allegedly shot on friday, in which it shows protesters trying to topple a statue of former president assad. in yemen, the president warns of a des
, fest snag in the no-fly zone. a u.s. jet fighter, f-15 crashed due to technical reasons just outside of the rebel stronghold of benghazi. it crashed in the feel. both crew members able to eject. both crew members safely out of the country. right now, qaddafi forces are dug in and according to the admiral in charge of coalition forces, they are attacking civilians that violates the u.n. security council resolution. this will be the first major test in an urban environment of how air power can help remove dug in government forces. in tripoli, libya, steve harrigan, fox news. >> thanks very much. just touched on the most important thing right now and that is the guys are driving around and killing people on the street. that people in tripoli say what we really need here is a no drive zone. >> that's what senator john mccain asked for. you have to ask yourself this. the minute we said there's going to be some action and we're going to do it to protect the libyan people. we find out that the libyan forces went right into the second biggest city that the rebels held so they start wiping th
. >> the president saying that u.s. ground force would not be part of that effort which apparently will be led by french and british soldiers. gadhafi's government has declared a cease-fire in an apparent bid to ward off strikes but that cease-fire apparently includes reports from rebels that they are still being shelved. two cities, including misrata reportedly still under attack. rebels in the eastern stronghold of benghazi are fortifying positions against a gadhafi attack and welcoming outside attack. >> gadhafi is not good. gadhaf is very, very dangerous. >> wait for france to bring battalion for the gadhafi forces and for us staying here we're waiting for our orders to move forward. >> course this action is in sharp contrast to the western response to events in yemen let alone u.s. supported dare i say it bank rolled allies like bahrain and saudi arabia who have been using our own weapons to crack down on their own people. their efforts met with stern words of warning from our country. joining us now lieutenant colonel tony shaf fer, former intelligence officer and with us from london phi
anything. >>alisyn: and he called it racist saying the u.s. and others are colonizing libya. muammar qaddafi is claiming there is a cease-fire and then, yet, going on, to say all of this stuff, they are massacring us and imposing a no-fly zone after the other and one military attack after another. this is hatred and racism. >> there are fears of terrorism in the united states in the allied power that will take on this effort in libya and that has been made clear by the white house. we have to also understand based upon muammar qaddafi's history of being allied with the greatest terrorists of the 20th century and the strongman dictators there will be a military response and we see it today, obviously not keeping the cease-fire. >> we will bring you the latest from libya all morning and we have a few other headlines. starting with this news alert. video giving us a look at the containment efforts going on at the nuclear sites in japan, spraying the reactors with water to keep temperatures down and stop a melt down. the real goal to restore the electric cooling pump. workers connected a
a country that has not attacked us? >> you know, i think barack obama and the u.s. is obviously in a tough place here. a country like the united states, there's a -- we have fundamental values that we are in favor of. and you know, gadhafi, you never know what he is going to do. there's always the potential of humanitarian disaster in libya. and i think that starting off with the u.n. resolution, the idea of the no-fly zone is a good start. do i believe that you need to move cautiously but i don't think the united states can just sit back and watch some terrible happening unfold in libya. >> especially if the president makes pronouncements like he has. especially the fact that he has been saying that gadhafi must go. i don't know what this has done to his credibility to not act on it. >> did the president make the right call? >> we're not doing this unilaterally. you said repeatedly on this show that the united states shouldn't go in there themselves, shouldn't be the world's policeman. >> agreed. >> we went to the u.n., particularly france, somewhat amazingly were in favor of going in the
hold 227 million barrels of oil. now, with u.s. consumption at about 20 million barrels a day, that reserve would run dry in about 36 days. senator roy blount, republican from missouri, joins us right now. good morning, senator. >> good morning, richard. and actually, this oil thing, this gas thing, may be even more important than charlie sheen, but who would know that? >> it is a very important thing. thanks for having a sense of humor about it. why not use the reserve to tamp down some of the price fears as we're really looking at a fragile economy right now? >> well, we are. and i'm not opposed to using some of the reserve. however, i thought the administration's energy policy was to make energy more expensive. and i don't know how long it's going to take us to learn this lesson that we're way too dependent on areas of the world that we have very little control over. and frankly who don't like us all that much. we need to be focused on more american energy and the way to do that is not to make energy more expensive but to be sure we're using the resources we have available
with rear admiral gerald huber providing an update on the situation in libya as well as the u.s. military action against government forces there. live from the pentagon. >> we're going to amp up the volume a little bit and then we'll be ready to go. we're here at the pentagon and we're pleased to be joined today by navy rear admiral girard p. huber u.s. naval forces europe and africa, director for policy resources and strategy. admiral huber is here to give a view on an operational update be it phone link again once again as yesterday from the uss mount whitney afloat in the mediterranean. admiral huber became the director of policy resources and strategy at u.s. naval forces europe and africa in august of 2009. he is currently the chief of staff for joint task force odyssey dawn, the task force established to provide operational and tactical international response to the unrest in libya and enforcement of u.n. security council resolution 1973. with that, admiral, i'll turn things over to you. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you, dave. thank you for the opportunity to talk about joint
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
. nato officially took over command of all air operations over libya from the u.s. the labor department releases weekly figures today on unemployment benefits. that release comes ahead of the big monthly report on the jobs market. finally, a new study says the cost of health care for retirees has gone down. the steady says that a 65-year- old couple retiring this year will need about $230,000 to cover medical expenses. last year, they would've needed $250,000. fidelity expects the projection to resume its upward trend. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, muammar gaddafi. he has denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent people around the world. >> follow what leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the house and senate floor and from author leaders around the world, all online on the c-span video library. follow c-span on twitter. it is the fastest way to get updates as well as links to evens t
from muammar qaddafi's troops as they try to retake a city near tripoli. the u.s. moving naval forces closer to the country in case civil war breaks out and the european union slapping an embargo on the country. no-fly zone is still on the table. that's not keeping from laughing at calls -- at qaddafi at laughing at calls for him to resign. he spoke to abc news. >> the leaders of britain and other leaders are calling on you to step down, to leave libya, to leave your position of power. will you do that? >> [laughing] who would leave his homeland? why do i leave my homeland? >> is that a "saturday night live" skit? it's a joke, i know. >> it looked like one. >> qaddafi denied he's firing on his own people, that's no joke and blames the violence on al-qaida. the worst night over in the midwest where overnight rain, hail and tornadoes destroyed homes and lives. let's go out to chattanooga, tennessee. firefighters pulled an elderly man out from under his home after a tree collapses on it. his injuries luckily not life threatening but the news not so good in franklin county, tennessee,
odyssey dawn? were opposition forces in libya informed by the u.s., the u.k. or france about the existence of these war games which may have encouraged them to actions leading to greater repression and a humanitarian crisis? in short, was this war against gaddafi's libya planned? or was it a spontaneous response to the great suffering which gaddafi was visiting upon his opposition? congress hasn't even considered this possibility. nato, which has now taken over enforcement of the no-fly zone, has more from an organization which pledged mutual support to defend north atlantic states from aggression, they've moved from that to military operations reaching from libya to the chinese border in afghanistan. north atlantic treaty organization. we need to know and we need to ask what role french air force general and current supreme allied commander of nato for transportation may have played in the development of operation southern storm and in discussions with the u.s. and the expansion of the u.n. mandate into a nato operation. what has been the role of the u.s. african command and central comma
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
a partnership called the u.s. integrated ocean observing system or i use led by noaa. collaboration will lift a veil of secret off the ocean. >> working in a vacuum is personally unsatisfying and professionally unsatisfying and all of a sudden to have 100 times more information overnight is really revolutionize the way we are doing our science. >> researchers say working together they can get a better picture of the ocean health and create policies to protect it. in pacific grove, abc 7 news. >>> scientist have discovered a new sea bird. first knew species of sea bird found in 55 years. the sparrow size black and white storm petrol discovered last month in a coastal area off chile. the bird was lakely missed by darwin when he sailed the same area a haven't century ago. how big a deal is this? if we had won the lottery we could not feel better. >> when we continue tonight. high school star makes the winning play then collapses and die. we learn what happened to had heart. >> fat deposit a check in his daughter account and the money goes missing. i'm michael. coming up on 7 on your side.
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
surveillance flights over libya. so is u.s. military intervention the next step? we will ask republican senator john mccain. >>> also rising tides. heavy raens and melting snow leads to dangerous flooding across part of the east coast and submerging homes and closing roads and leaving a path of destruction. we are going to bring you the very latest on when the waters may recede. >>> sorry, charlie. warner brothers fires actor charlie sheen from "two and a half men" after weeks of bizarre behavior. >> you had the poetry in your fingertips the entire time to read my perfect panels and perfect words but you didn't go there because you judged me and condemned me and discarded me. well, not mi more! winning! >> we're going to tell you what is next for the troubled star "early" this tuesday morning, march 8th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> hi, everyone. welcome to "the early show" here on a tuesday morning. i'm chris wragge in new york. erica hill is in our nation's capital this morning. >> good morning to everyone at home. i'm on the set of "face the nation." bob schieffer kind unfortunate in t
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
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